Category Archives: Medical Appointments


Office Visit

There’s a difference between a general physical and a regular office visit. Knowing the difference can save you a lot of frustration when dealing with your doctor.

What’s an office visit?

An office visit is when you will discuss a new or existing health problem. You may get additional tests run or a referral to a specialist who deals with this problem specifically. Your doctor may prescribe a medication to treat the problem or reassess an existing prescription. This is also the type of visit you have when you want to talk about several vague problems that you’re concerned might add up to something more serious.

Office Visit

What’s a general physical?

A physical is all about preventive healthcare. Regular screenings and a general review of your current medical problems and prescriptions will happen at an annual exam. This is the appointment when your doctor will assess things like how your diet and exercise are affecting your health and what you can do to improve these things. You will get any necessary immunizations at this visit. For this reason, patients often schedule their general physical in the fall so they can get the flu shot without scheduling a special appointment. The key thing here is that physicals deal with the well-being of a person who is generally healthy.

Where the confusion comes in

If you go to your doctor for an ear infection, you will be scheduled for an office visit. You can’t expect your doctor to discuss how your diet may be contributing to iron deficiency to any great length at this visit.

Likewise, don’t schedule a physical to save yourself a co-pay (often insurance companies don’t charge a co-pay for a physical) when you want to discuss your chronic headaches.

How often should I get a general physical?

  • Ages 19-21, once every 2-3 yearsPhysical
  • Ages 22-64, once every 1-3 years
  • Over age 65, once a year

Of course, if you have certain risk factors such as diabetes, depression, smoking etc., your doctor may recommend more frequent physicals.

Why can’t I just talk about what’s going on with my health?

You can, but you have to understand that you might need to schedule more than one appointment if you want your concerns to get the attention they deserve. That’s because of the way appointments are scheduled. The reason for this scheduling system is proper billing, and allotting enough time for each of the doctor’s patient’s needs.

An example:

If Mrs. X comes in for an appointment about her ear infection, she is given a 10-minute appointment. She may be in the office for 30 minutes, but she gets 10 minutes with the doctor. When the doctor gets into the room she springs on him that she is also dealing with chronic incontinence (inability to control her bladder). That’s an entirely different problem that probably requires a urologist. SO, the doctor doesn’t even talk to her about the incontinence other than to give her a referral to the urologist, and he gives her a prescription for an antibiotic for her ear infection. Mrs. X feels like he glossed over her problems. In fact, the doctor did the best thing he could do (albeit in a rushed manner) because he had to fit 2 problems into 1 appointment slot.

If your doctor refers you to a specialist

Sometimes patients feel like their doctor is pushing them off to another doctor because they don’t want to deal with them. Nothing could be farther from the truth. In fact, seeing a specialist is the best thing you can do if you have a specialized problem. For example, if you suffer from chronic headaches, a neurologist may be the best person to assess and treat the problem.

If you would like to get more information on how to get more out of your doctor appointments, sign up for the FREE Appointment 101 series!

WHAT ARE YOUR THOUGHTS?

I’d love to hear in the comment section, below. I appreciate my readers as well as the writing community. To show that appreciation, I use Comment Luv. Just leave a comment below and your latest post will get a link next to it. Thank you!

ABOUT HEATHER ERICKSON

In 2012 doctors diagnosed my husband, Dan, with stage IV lung cancer. Since then, our family has been learning what it means to face cancer. I’ve focused my writing and speaking on helping cancer patients and their families advocate for themselves and live life to the fullest, in spite of their illness. My goal is to help people face cancer with grace.

My book Facing Cancer as a Friend: How to Support Someone Who Has Cancer, is available on Amazon.com

I also blog at Heather Erickson Author/Writer/Speaker

The Erickson Family, Photo by Everbranch Photography

Originally posted 2017-12-16 15:55:06.


Interpreter

Have you ever thought about what it’s like to have limited English speaking skills? How would you handle things like a doctor’s appointment? There are things such as disabilities, and being a Limited-English speaking person (or LEP), which can affect your communication with your health care team and your access to support services.  Today, we’re going to learn why an interpreter is a crucial part of health care for people who aren’t fluent in English.

18%, or 47 million people in 2000, spoke a Language other than English at home. 8.1% of the population, age 5 and older spoke English less than “very well” (2000 US Census)

Check-in Downstairs

A few years ago, our local clinic was getting a major renovation. For 2 years they jostled departments around and several times, even moved where patients checked in. When they moved the check-in desk from the 2nd floor to the 1st floor, I witnessed something that made me see how hard something as basic as a doctor’s appointment can be for someone who doesn’t speak English well.

Use an interpreter if English is a second language, to get the best care

I saw a little old lady who I would guess was from Russia or the eastern bloc. She made it all the way up to the second floor, pushing her walker an inch at a time, only to discover they weren’t doing check-ins there anymore. She tried to get the attention of the woman at the desk. Finally, the woman noticed her and said, “There was a sign downstairs. You have to go back down.” There was little sign of understanding. After some exchange, the little old lady returned to the first floor with great effort. Fifteen minutes later, she returned. Her doctor was on the second floor. She looked completely exhausted from the up and down and up again.

I imagined how hard it must be to immigrate as an old woman; a whole new country, a new language, and health problems, as well. She needed an interpreter.

Who has a right to a translator or interpreter*?

If you’re hearing impaired, under the Title III of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), your health care provider must provide you with an interpreter, if you need one in order to clearly communicate with your healthcare provider.

Under Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, discrimination based on national origin is prohibited. Executive Order 13166 issued in 2000, says that people have a right to meaningful access to federally funded programs and activities. Many individual federal programs, states, and localities also have provisions requiring language services for LEP individuals. These provisions are valid, even in “English-only” states. For more information, check out the LEP.gov website.

*The difference between a translator and an interpreter is described well at Language Scientific’s website. Check it out.

What’s the process of getting a translator?

If you or a loved one needs these services, contact your health care provider prior to your appointment, to let them know. Don’t hire your own interpreter and expect to be reimbursed. Most medical facilities contract with a third-party company which provides translators and/or interpreters on an on-call, as needed basis, at no cost to the patient. Covering the cost of the interpreter is one of the normal costs of operating a business for your clinic or hospital.

Just say “NO”

Occasionally, a health care provider may try to encourage you to bring a family member or friend to your appointment as a way to “save costs.” Say no. It is difficult for family members and friends to be neutral and translate everything they hear. Using family and friends as interpreters can also have a negative effect on your patient confidentiality. Instead, if you are comfortable, bring a trusted friend with to your appointment to keep an ear out for anything that might be lost in translation.

Also, Medical Interpreters are qualified in ways which even someone who is bilingual can’t compare to. They have expert knowledge of proper medical terminology, enabling them to facilitate communication effectively. This saves time and prevents medical mistakes based on miscommunication. They are also available on-demand, night or day.

“But I don’t need an interpreter.”

You may be wondering how this pertains to you. First, I hope that I’ve opened your eyes to something that many of us know little about. It also illustrates a picture of health care for all of us. It is a specialized area that many people don’t fully understand. It’s like they are speaking one language and the doctors are speaking another. This causes confusion and miscommunication. These are the root of many frustrations in life. Never be afraid to ask for clarification when you don’t understand something your doctor says or does.

For more information on using an interpreter see:

Office of Inspector General, Guidance and Standards on Language Access Services: Medicare Providers (Department of Health & Human Services)

Also, if you would like to get more information on how to get more out of your doctor appointments, sign up for the FREE Appointment 101 series!

What are YOUR thoughts?

I’d love to hear in the comment section, below. I appreciate my readers as well as the writing community. To show that appreciation, I use Comment Luv. Just leave a comment below and your latest post will get a link next to it. Thank you!

ABOUT HEATHER ERICKSON

In 2012 doctors diagnosed my husband, Dan, with stage IV lung cancer. Since then, our family has been learning what it means to face cancer. I’ve focused my writing and speaking on helping cancer patients and their families advocate for themselves and live life to the fullest, in spite of their illness. My goal is to help people face cancer with grace.

My book Facing Cancer as a Friend: How to Support Someone Who Has Cancer, is available on Amazon.com

I also blog at Heather Erickson Author/Writer/Speaker

The Erickson Family, Photo by Everbranch Photography

Originally posted 2017-12-16 15:36:36.


Advance Care Directive

What is an Advance Care Directive?

People often think of an advance care directive in the context of a terminal illness, such as cancer. But, this legal document should be in place for unexpected emergencies, such as car accidents, as well. It is also known as a healthcare declaration, a directive to physicians, a medical directive, a health care directive, and a living will. The exact terminology often depends on where you live.

Planning Ahead: Yes, You Do Need One!

Advance care directives are a powerful tool. They take away guilt and resentment that survivors may have regarding how someone has died. You’re able to be very specific about your feelings regarding end-of-life care, removing any doubts that various family members may have. This is what most people associate with an advance care directive (A.K.A. Living Will).

You should create one as soon as possible, ideally, before you are ever faced with a life-threatening accident or illness. Once you are ill, the process of putting together your advance care directive can seem emotionally overwhelming. It’ll make you acutely aware of the fact that you will, in fact, die long before you want to. It’s real, rather than theoretical, as I would be if you weren’t facing death. It doesn’t matter whether you’ve just been diagnosed or you’ve been fighting your cancer for a long time and can feel death knocking on the door of your life.

Advance Care Directive

Our Story

In the beginning of Dan’s cancer journey, he had a very hard time approaching the advance care directive. So, I got a booklet[1] and went through 2-3 questions each day with him. I asked him the questions and he answered. When I needed some things to be clarified I asked further questions so that there was no doubt in my mind as to what his wishes were. I wrote all of his answers down as he gave them.

This process took the logistical burden off of him and it made the process less overwhelming. We always stopped after 2 or 3 questions so it didn’t feel so awful. The other benefit to this was that he and I were communicating about his wishes. This is essential since I will need to ensure they were carried out as he wished. I was listed as his proxy, giving me the final say about his health care.

Power of Attorney*

Power of attorney gives someone you choose, the right to act on your behalf in financial or real estate issues. This sometimes scares people. Handing over that kind of legal power is a big deal. It’s actually not as concerning as it sounds. For one thing, you will choose someone who you really trust.

Secondly, there are different types of power of attorney. In real estate, we often have clients who are unable to be at closing. They give someone they trust, a limited, or “specific,” power of attorney. This allows the proxy to sign legal documents on their behalf in that instance only, or in all legal matters that are defined, for a limited period of time.

In most cases, power of attorney will end if it expires during the time the person granting it becomes incapacitated. So how does this help you in a medical emergency? You will want to make sure that you have a durable power of attorney in place. This is done by adding additional language to reflect your wishes.

Advance Directive

Medical Power of Attorney*

Power of attorney documents ensure your financial and legal issues will be handled if you are unable to, but what about medical decisions that need to be made? This is where the medical power of attorney comes into play. This is also known as durable power of attorney for healthcare, healthcare proxy, or healthcare agent. Just as in a power of attorney, you’ll want to make sure the proxy you choose is someone you trust to carry out your medical decisions if you are unable to.

Make it Legal*

No matter what, you should get in touch with an attorney who can give you the specific legal information that fits your situation. Laws vary from state to state, so you always want to make sure you are following your local laws. National Cancer Legal Services Network offers referrals to free legal services programs so that people affected by cancer may focus on medical care and their quality of life.

Your Proxy and Other Loved Ones

“Because I love you, I need to know what you want. Because you love me, you need to let me know, so I can know what to do.” -Dr. Vic Sandler

When looking for a proxy (which you’ll need), a spouse is ideal. Whoever you choose, they will need to be someone whom you can count on to carry out your wishes. They may need to be strong in the midst of other loved ones who don’t understand the decisions you’ve made.

Often, a patient decides that there is a point at which they no longer wish to keep fighting. This may be at the point when they are no longer able to express their wishes and must count on a proxy to carry them out. This may mean not opting for ventilation machines or feeding tubes.

The thought of losing the patient can be unbearable to family and friends. They may get angry with the proxy for making decisions that the patient would have wanted. The best prevention for this is to make it very clear to everyone in your family and close circle of friends what your wishes are. Also, tell your loved ones and your proxy, that you’re so grateful to have a proxy you can count on to carry your wishes out. Hearing these things from your lips will go a long way toward giving all of your loved one’s peace of mind.

It’s important that you talk to your children about this. Explain to them, in an age-appropriate way, why you’re making the decisions you’re making. They need to know that you’d rather be with them, but that your time is becoming short. You want the time you have together to be good time.

Family Care Conference

Your Advance Care Directive is More than Medical

After you’ve written or filled out your Advance care directive you’ll need to have it notarized. You then give it to your clinic to keep on file in the event there is a question of how to proceed near the end of your life.

The advance care directive addresses your specific health care desires as you near the end of life, but it isn’t limited to medical decisions. As part of this process, you can also express what you’d like done in your last days and hours.

  • Who’s going to be at your bedside?
  • Do you want everyone you know, there? Do you want time reserved for your closest family members?
  • Is there anyone you don’t want there?
  • Would you like music played?
  • Is there a special pet you’d like to hold?
  • How would you like to be dressed?
  • Do you wish to have a member of the clergy there? Anyone in particular?

The more, well thought out the process of death is, the better the death can be. The better your death is, the easier it is for your family to cope after you’re gone.

Footnotes:

[1] Advance care directive paperwork (or booklets) are usually available from your doctor’s office. While not essential, a pre-designed booklet made specifically for planning your advance care directive can be extremely helpful in this process. It will ensure that you have covered all of the bases and guide you through the process.

*Note: Please see our Legal Disclaimer.

WHAT ARE YOUR THOUGHTS?

I’d love to hear in the comment section, below. I appreciate my readers as well as the writing community. To show that appreciation, I use Comment Luv. Just leave a comment below and your latest post will get a link next to it. Thank you!

ABOUT HEATHER ERICKSON

In 2012 doctors diagnosed my husband, Dan, with stage IV lung cancer. Since then, our family has been learning what it means to face cancer. I’ve focused my writing and speaking on helping cancer patients and their families advocate for themselves and live life to the fullest, in spite of their illness. My goal is to help people face cancer with grace.

My book Facing Cancer as a Friend: How to Support Someone Who Has Cancer, is available on Amazon.com

I also blog at Heather Erickson Author/Writer/Speaker

The Erickson Family, Photo by Everbranch Photography

Originally posted 2017-12-14 02:52:41.


HIPPA

I’m doing double duty this month during the A to Z Blogging Challenge. Here at Facing Cancer with Grace, I will focus on caregiving. I’ll also be doing the challenge at Heather Erickson Author/Writer/Speaker, where I will share ways to increase your creativity. I hope you’ll visit me at both sites. While you’re here, sign up for my email list. Today’s post is H for Understanding HIPPA.

Before you or your loved one ever get to see a doctor before they’ll even bring you back to an appointment room, the receptionist is going to slide a bunch of forms across the desk and ask you to sign. Some of them are forms that record your health history. Among these is a form about who the clinic can talk to about your personal information. This is called HIPPA.

Sign Here Please

HIPPA is the law that protects patient privacy. Unless a patient signs these forms and gives permission for the doctor to tell you anything about the patient’s health, they can’t tell you anything. To understand why your loved one’s doctor’s office may sometimes get a little touchy about this, it’s important to understand HIPPA.

Why HIPPA Matters

Health care providers can’t share a patient’s information with anyone without permission from the patient. Not their insurance company, another health care provider, employer, neighbor, kids or spouse—no one. That’s why they make you sign a bunch of paperwork every year, giving them permission to share information with your insurance company so that your bills can get paid.

If your loved one wants you, as their caregiver, to be able to talk to their doctor about your health care (and they should) they will need to give written permission.HIPPA

What is HIPPA, anyway?

HIPPA is an acronym that stands for the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act. HIPPA established a generally accepted set of security standards or requirements for protecting health information which didn’t exist prior to 1996 in the healthcare industry. This became even more important as technology evolved and health care providers moved to computer-based systems.
While computers are an easy and efficient way to document, store and transmit your medical records, those records are also more vulnerable to a breach of privacy. While this was one of the things which drew attention to the importance of privacy in regards to our health care. HIPPA was enacted to protect patients’ healthcare information and privacy in any and all ways that information is shared, whether it be paper, digital, phone, or person to person.

This is a very brief overview of HIPPA. To learn more visit hhs.gov.

Resources

I’m in the early stages of putting together a resource page for caregivers of cancer patients. I’d love it if you’d check it out and email me any suggestions of resources you’d recommend. While you’re here, sign up for my email list to get a periodic email newsletter to encourage you on your cancer journey.

What are YOUR thoughts?

I’d love to hear in the comment section, below. I appreciate my readers as well as the writing community. To show that appreciation, I use Comment Luv. Just leave a comment below and your latest post will get a link next to it. Thank you!

ABOUT HEATHER ERICKSON

In 2012 doctors diagnosed my husband, Dan, with stage IV lung cancer. Since then, our family has been learning what it means to face cancer. I’ve focused my writing and speaking on helping cancer patients and their families advocate for themselves and live life to the fullest, in spite of their illness. My goal is to help people face cancer with grace.

My book Facing Cancer as a Friend: How to Support Someone Who Has Cancer, is available on Amazon.com

I also blog at Heather Erickson Author/Writer/Speaker

Originally posted 2018-04-09 07:00:11.


Get a Mammogram

Today (May 14, 2018) is National Women’s Check-Up Day. Even if you aren’t getting a check-up today, you can make the call to schedule one. You can also decide whether or not to get a mammogram. Here are the basics:

When and how often should you get a mammogram?

Until recently, recommendations were for women to get screening mammograms beginning at age 40. Recently, the American Cancer Society has said that women can wait until age 45 to start getting annual mammograms and cut back to every other year once they turn 55. Still, they should have the option to get a mammogram beginning at age 40.

When you get a mammogram, is a personal decision that should be made based on your doctor’s recommendations and your personal medical history.  Be aware, that you don’t need to get one as early or as often as it was recommended in the past.

I recently had my first mammogram at age 42.

Why did I decide to have a screening mammogram before age 45?

Because:

  • My doctor recommended it and I trust her.
  • I’m very aware of false positives and won’t get stressed out if initial tests results are unclear.
  • I have seen what happens when cancer isn’t caught early.

Check out my post on a day in the life of a cancer patient, Living with Cancer

Planning to get a mammogram? Here are some tips:

  • It’s a good idea to have your mammogram at the same facility and at the same time of year so images can easily be compared from year to year.
  • If you’ve had a mammogram in the past and then, get a mammogram someplace new, either bring your records with you or have them sent to the new facility. That way the older pictures can be compared with the new ones.
  • Avoid scheduling your mammogram the week prior to your period to avoid swollen tender breasts. This will reduce discomfort and you will get better images.

You might be offered 2 types of mammograms

2D Mammograms are the usual mammogram. They are covered by most health insurances and will do a good job of screening.

3D Mammograms are clearer and more detailed. Most insurances DON’T cover 3D mammograms, so if you would like one, be prepared to pay out of pocket. Also, there is no evidence that the new 3D mammograms save more lives than the traditional 2D mammograms. Be aware, though, that they are available.

The day of your mammogram

  • Don’t wear any lotions, antiperspirants or perfumes. They can show up on the image.
  • Be sure to let the technician know if you are pregnant or breastfeeding, as well as any changes in your breasts.

What to expect

You will be given a gown and asked to undress from the waist up.

The technician will position one breast on the machine’s plastic plate. Then she will lower another plastic plate, compressing your breast. This will be done horizontally, and then diagonally, ensuring the image includes tissue that goes into your armpit. The diagonal compression does pinch a bit, but overall, the procedure doesn’t hurt and lasts only seconds.

That being said, don’t be surprised if your breasts feel tender the next day.

If you have breast implants or large breasts, they may take more than the usual two images per breast.

What if you are called back after your mammogram?

Most of the time, you will be notified by the radiologist or your doctor that your mammogram was normal. Sometimes, you will be notified within 5 days that they would like to take more images.  This is called a diagnostic mammogram. That may sound scary, but try not to worry.

Usually, this is nothing to be alarmed by. You may have a cyst or noncancerous tumor. The image may have been unclear or shown dense tissue that the radiologist wants a better look at.

During a diagnostic mammogram, more images will be taken than at a screening mammogram. You may also have an ultrasound done. or other imaging.

Get a mammogram

If it’s time for you to get a mammogram, don’t put it off.  It’s better to get it out of the way than to find out too late that something is wrong. You will sleep better knowing you are in good health.

WHAT ARE YOUR THOUGHTS?

I’d love to hear in the comment section, below. I appreciate my readers as well as the writing community. To show that appreciation, I use Comment Luv. Just leave a comment below and your latest post will get a link next to it. Thank you!

ABOUT HEATHER ERICKSON

In 2012 doctors diagnosed my husband, Dan, with stage IV lung cancer. Since then, our family has been learning what it means to face cancer. I’ve focused my writing and speaking on helping cancer patients and their families advocate for themselves and live life to the fullest, in spite of their illness. My goal is to help people face cancer with grace.

My book Facing Cancer as a Friend: How to Support Someone Who Has Cancer, is available on Amazon.com

I also blog at Heather Erickson Author/Writer/Speaker


Internet Research

In the past, patients were often told to avoid doing their own internet research. That was because the internet really is a dumping ground for both information and misinformation. More and more, doctors are appreciating their patients’ efforts to participate in their healthcare. This is especially true when the patient uses internet research wisely.

Benefits of doing your own research:

You can decide if what is happening merits a trip to the doctor.

Often you can be put at ease when you discover your symptoms might feel awful, but you most likely have a cold. Sometimes, odd, but otherwise painless symptoms mean something more ominous is happening. For example, when my husband felt 3 hardened lymph nodes above his left collarbone (supraclavicular nodes), that specific symptom was said to indicate a 90% chance of metastatic lung cancer. It seemed improbable since he had never smoked and like most people, we thought of lung cancer as a smoker’s disease. Still, he made an appointment that saved his life.

Your doctor can’t keep up with all of the latest innovations in their field

Often, we expect our doctors to know everything. The medical field has become a complex place. Two years ago, my husband was ready to go to hospice. He could barely breathe; the cancer had so filled his lungs. He’d been following the experience of a blogger who was on a trial. Dan seemed to fit the profile of an ideal candidate for the drug. Finally, the FDA approved Tagrisso (a couple of months ahead of schedule). Dan asked his doctor to look into it. She did. She had him tested for the mutation the drug-treated and he was a match! Within two weeks of being on the drug, he was able to breathe again. He’s been on the drug ever since. His doctor appreciated his research and self-advocacy.

There are some drawbacks to internet research:

Sometimes the thing you think will be great—isn’t.

I’ve been using turmeric supplements as a way to ease the pain I experience from rheumatoid arthritis. Because it has worked well for me, we wondered if it would help with the pain Dan is in every day. We asked the palliative care specialist about it. She told us that even though turmeric is natural and over the counter, it isn’t something Dan should use. Turmeric is a natural blood thinner and Dan is a hemophiliac. It can also affect his blood counts that are already low because of the treatment he is on. We were glad we didn’t assume that an otherwise safe supplement is safe for him. Always check with your doctor about over the counter or “natural” supplements.

Internet Research isn’t a replacement for a doctor

No matter how empowered we can feel by the internet, there’s no replacement for a medical degree and years of experience. I often write posts for Quora, a user-input-based site. Every week, scared people ask me if their symptoms are indicative of cancer. I use the platform to encourage people to see their doctor when they are experiencing unusual symptoms. While most of these people don’t have cancer, there is often something happening with their health which needs to be addressed by a medical professional.

How you approach internet research is important

“Just the facts, Ma’am.”

Internet research has become second nature for most people, whether they are looking for a new car or the latest cancer treatments. It’s easy to pull up endless pages of information. But is the information factual? Is it experiential? Positive? Negative? These can be difficult questions to answer.

While the internet can be a valuable tool, it can also be a very frightening place, especially when you research cancer. Survival rates and statistics sound overwhelming when they’re not placed in the proper context. If you choose to research your symptoms or your diagnosis on the internet, use reputable websites. What makes a site, “reputable?”

User-Input Based Sites

Social Media and other user-input based sites such as forums have given everyone a platform. Because of that, there’s a lot more opinion on the internet than fact—especially when it comes to health issues. It’s difficult to wade through the endless sea of contradicting statements. Everyone has an opinion about cancer, cancer treatment, and what people should be doing. Random, anonymous people are very comfortable giving their opinions online. “Opinions,” is the keyword.

Many people use the Internet as their therapist. They post all their fears and the “what-ifs” online, where to the undiscerning eye, it can be frightening. While blogs and “cancer support” sites can be helpful for patients looking for support, they can also be a source of misinformation and confusion. The Internet tends to capture the negative. Because of this, use caution when reading user-input based sites. Keep in mind that the writer’s individual situation is different from yours.

Reading as a writer

Pseudoscience

Pseudoscience is rampant on the Internet. The Scrivener WordNet Dictionary defines pseudoscience as, “an activity resembling science but based on fallacious assumptions.”

Problems arise when patients or their loved ones believe pseudoscience and it contradicts what a health care provider recommends. This can cause a patient to delay a legitimate course of treatment. Meanwhile, cancer can spread.

This isn’t only a problem with cancer. I know of someone who didn’t follow their doctor’s advice in favor of another form of “treatment” for their diabetes. She went blind and ultimately died of a diabetic coma.

Rifts between family members often happen when they don’t agree on a treatment approach in light of a false promise made on the internet. The result is guilt, discord, and hurt feelings within the family.

What you need are facts pertaining to the cancer that you or your family is facing, rather than the cancer someone else has.

 

Using Trusted Resources

Health information, whether in print or online, should come from a trusted, credible source. Government agencies, hospitals, universities, medical journals, and books that provide evidence-based information are sources you can trust. Too often, other sources can provide misleading or incorrect information. If it makes claims that are too good to be true, remember—they usually are.

The National Cancer Institute gives the following advice on internet research:

Online sources of health information should make it easy for people to learn who is responsible for posting the information. They should make clear the original source of the information, along with the medical credentials of the people who prepare or review the posted material.

Use the following questions to determine the credibility of health information published online:

  • Who manages this information? The person or group that has published health information online should be identified somewhere.
  • Who is paying for the project, and what is their purpose? You should be able to find this information in the “About Us” section.
  • What is the original source of the information that they have posted? If the information was originally published in a research journal or a book, they should say which one(s) so that you can find it.
  • How is information reviewed before it gets posted? Most health information publications have someone with medical or research credentials (e.g., someone who has earned an M.D., D.O., or Ph.D.) review the information before it gets posted, to make sure it is correct.
  • How current is the information? Online health information sources should show you when the information was posted or last reviewed.
  • If they are asking for personal information, how will they use that information and how will they protect your privacy? This is very important. Do not share personal information until you understand the policies under which it will be used and you are comfortable with any risk involved in sharing your information online.

You can learn more about doing internet research as well as using other sources of information cancer, by checking out the National Cancer Institutes’s Website: http://www.cancer.gov/about-cancer/managing-care/using-trusted-resources.

Sometimes it’s good to take a “digital break.”

While internet research can be really helpful, there are also times when it’s good to take a digital break.  That’s what I’m going to be doing in the month of January. I’ve noticed that I’m not getting as much writing done as I should be, so rather than spending time on email, social media, and other online activities; I will be writing and reconnecting with my goals for 2018. You will still see weekly blog posts on Facing Cancer with Grace, because I have already written them and will post them automatically, using a scheduler. Even though I may not respond to your comments right away, I will read them and appreciate them greatly. Since I won’t be sharing my posts to social media in January I would appreciate it if those of you who use social media would share my posts. Thank you!

What are YOUR thoughts?

I’d love to hear in the comment section, below. I appreciate my readers as well as the writing community. To show that appreciation, I use Comment Luv. Just leave a comment below and your latest post will get a link next to it. Thank you!

ABOUT HEATHER ERICKSON

In 2012 doctors diagnosed my husband, Dan, with stage IV lung cancer. Since then, our family has been learning what it means to face cancer. I’ve focused my writing and speaking on helping cancer patients and their families advocate for themselves and live life to the fullest, in spite of their illness. My goal is to help people face cancer with grace.

My book Facing Cancer as a Friend: How to Support Someone Who Has Cancer, is available on Amazon.com

I also blog at Heather Erickson Author/Writer/Speaker

The Erickson Family, Photo by Everbranch Photography

Originally posted 2018-01-15 07:00:48.

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